ASCS

 

ASCS Prizes and Awards

 

Greek and Latin Unseen Translation Competition

This annual Competition was introduced in 2007. It is open to second and third year undergraduate students in Australian and New Zealand universities. It involves a 45-minute unseen test in either the first or the second week of October. Entries are to be made by academic staff teaching relevant Greek and Latin classes. There is a prize of AUD$250 for the best entry in each language.

The Co-Ordinator for the 2013 Competition is Dr Patrick O’Sullivan (p.osullivan@clas.canterbury.ac.nz); the supervisor of the Greek section is Assoc. Prof. Robin Bond (robin.bond@canterbury.ac.nz), and of the Latin section, Dr Jane Bellemore (jane.bellemore @newcastle.edu.au).

 

ASCS Australian Essay Competition

This annual Competition, which has been running since 1990, is open to undergraduate students in Australian universities. The essay submitted may be a revised version of an essay, tutorial paper or seminar paper by a student enrolled in a first, second or third year course. The essay may be on any aspect of Classical Studies (that is, the languages, history, thought and archaeology of the Ancient World). The length should be between 2000 and 3000 words, and the entry should be submitted through the ASCS Representative in each Australian university. The closing date for entries is usually towards the end of November each year. The first prize is currently $500, and there are up to two prizes of $100 each for “runner-up” entries.

The Competition Co-Ordinator for 2013 is Dr Lara O’Sullivan (lara.osullivan@uwa.edu.au). Questions about the Competition can be directed to her. Competition entries should also be sent to her.

 

ASCS New Zealand Essay Competition

This annual Competition was initiated by the Classical Association of Otago in 2002 and named in honour of John Barsby, the Professor (now retired) of Classics at the University of Otago in Dunedin, New Zealand. In 2009 ASCS assumed responsibility for the funding of the prizes, which currently are NZ$200 for first place and NZ$75 for second place. The winning essay is usually published in Scholia, the international journal which is edited by the present holder of the Chair of Classics at the University of Otago, Professor William Dominik.

 

OPTIMA (“Outstanding Postgraduate Talk In a Meeting of ASCS”)

This annual Award, introduced at ASCS 31 (2010) in Perth, is aimed at rewarding the outstanding postgraduate presentation at the ASCS annual conference. First prize for the Award is AUD$500, with up to two runner-up prizes of AUD$100 each.

 

Early Career Award

This annual Award, introduced in 2005, is intended to offer acknowledgement and some financial support to those who are “early career” scholars, and to assist them in the development of an academic career. The Award is currently worth AUD$3000. Applications are open to those who have completed a doctorate by research in the last five years at an Australian or New Zealand university, and who do not hold a full-time teaching or research position at a university or tertiary institution or who are in a full-time but non-academic position.

 

Student Conference Travel Subsidies

ASCS sets aside an amount of money each year (usually AUD$3000-4000) to provide subsidies for postgraduate and other students at both Australian and New Zealand universities towards the cost of travel to attend its annual conference. Subsidies are provided towards the cost of travel only, but not for the costs of registration or accommodation. Students are also encouraged to investigate whether funding for conference travel is available from their own department or university.

It is a condition of applying for a subsidy that the applicant be a current member of ASCS. Applications are usually called for in October each year. For further information contact the ASCS Postgraduate Representative (timothy.scott@students.mq.edu.au).

The ASCS Journal
Antichthon
Antichthon Journal

Newsflash

ASCS 36 (2015) Call for Papers